Retained Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)

Symetrical Tonic Neck Reflex ExercisesThe Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex is present at birth then disappears until about 6 to 9 months. It reappears for a few months to assist in learning to crawl.

You will notice it in a baby if you move their chin down toward their chest. The knees will bend. If you move the head up toward the back, the legs will straighten. Do not confuse this with the Landau Reflex. They are two separate reflexes.

If this does not integrate and disappear by about 11 months, it can cause motor learning and behavior disorders. Simple exercises can solve the problem.

 

Symptoms of Retained Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

  • Poor posture Standing
  • Sits with slumpy posture
  • Low muscle tone
  • Ape-like walk
  • Problems with attention especially in stressful situations
  • Vision accommodation and tracking problems
  • Difficulty learning to swim
  • Difficulty reading
  • Usually skips crawling
  • Sits with legs in a W position
  • ADD
  • ADHD
  • Hyper activity or fidgety
  • Poor hand eye coordination
  • Problems looking between near and far sighted objects, like copying from a chalkboard
  • Sloppy eater
  • Rotated Pelvis
  • Even if they don’t display any of these symptoms, it is a good idea to do the quick test on them, as there may be other functions that are affected by it that are still unknown.

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Retained Palmar Reflex or Grasp Reflex

Palmar Reflex The Palmar Reflex aka Grasp Reflex is seen when an infant grips around an object that touches their palm. This is normal and helps the baby learn to grip and hang on to things with their hands. The palmar reflex develops in the third month of gestation and should disappear at around 3-6 months of age as they gain hand control. It is needed for hand-eye coordination, proper vision, and direction/distance judgement.  If it isn’t properly integrated it can contribute to an array of problems.

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 Retained Palmar Reflex Symptoms

  • Poor handwriting
  • Poor pencil grip
  • Poor Fine Muscle Control
  • Poor dexterity
  • Poor fine motor skills
  • Poor vision coordination
  • Slumpy posture when using hands
  • Back aches when sitting
  • Sticks tongue out when using hands
  • Poor pencil grip
  • Poor ability to put thoughts to paper
  • Dysgraphia
  • Speech and language problems
  • Anger control issues
  • Even if they don’t display any of these symptoms, it is a good idea to do the quick test on them, as there may be other functions that are affected by it that are still unknown.

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